Ep. #11-Breakdown



On this week’s episode, we discuss Jonathan Mostow’s 1997 thriller BREAKDOWN, in which Kurt Russell’s hair tracks down the sinister backwoods truckers who have kidnapped his wife. Yeah, it’s as badass as it sound. All hail The Russell!


Ep. #10-Pootie Tang



As the latest Spider-Man swings its way into theaters, this week we take a look at a very different kind of hero introduced to audiences in the summer of 2001–the one and only POOTIE TANG, courtesy of Louis C.K., of all people. Armed with gibberish, a magical belt, and the world’s worst film editor, he’s gonna sine your pitty on the runny kine, whether you like it or not. Kapa-chow!


Ep. #9-The Book of Henry



On this week’s episode we head back to the movies for 2017’s THE BOOK OF HENRY, and how could we resist? It’s a heartwarming family dramedy featuring such staples of the genre as child sexual abuse, negligent parents, terminal illness, interpretive dance, and cold-blooded murder. Yeah, this one’s crazy. So grab a waffle and take a listen! WARNING! THIS EPISODE CONTAINS MAJOR SPOILERS!!


Ep. #8-It Comes At Night



On this week’s episode we head to the movie theater and check out a film that critics love and audiences seem to despise, 2017’s “horror” flick IT COMES AT NIGHT. So what exactly is ‘it’? Why is ‘it’ coming? And, hey, why is the screen suddenly so tiny? We attempt to get to the bottom of it all, while wondering why the studio’s marketing team hasn’t yet been drawn and quartered. WARNING! THIS EPISODE CONTAINS MAJOR SPOILERS!!


Ep. #7-High Tension



On this week’s episode we delve into 2005’s HIGH TENSION, an extreme horror flick from France directed by Alexandre Aja that was hacked to death in the editing room by Lionsgate. Hell, they even added an English dub for all you stupid Americans out there! And yet something tells us the exploding heads and repugnant homophobia would have crossed any language barrier with ease. So sit back with your favorite decapitated noggin and enjoy!


Ep. #6-People Like Us



As the latest version of THE MUMMY lurches its way into theaters, we take a look at director Alex Kurtzman’s directorial debut, 2012’s family dramedy PEOPLE LIKE US, a film that forces us to ask the question, “Is incest ok when the participants are Chris Pine and Elizabeth Banks?” The argument gets heated.


Ep. #5-187



On this week’s episode we tackle 1997’s 187, in which Waterworld director Kevin Reynolds attempts to subvert the inspirational teacher flick by giving us a murderous–and shockingly subdued–Samuel L. Jackson as a vengeance-seeking educator. Limbs will be severed, lives will be taken, and lessons will be imparted. Oh, and if you thought Dangerous Minds would have been cooler if it ended with a game of Russian Roulette, look no further!


Ep. #4-Even Cowgirls Get the Blues



On this week’s episode we tackle 1994’s ill-conceived Tom Robbins adaptation EVEN COWGIRLS GET THE BLUES, in which indie auteur Gus Van Sant tried his hand at comedy–with disastrous results. Big phallic thumbs, literal douche bags, peyote, countless celebrity cameos, and some stock footage whooping cranes all combine to create a maddening viewing experience. You’ve been warned.


Ep. #3-Excessive Force



This week we delve into 1993’s action “extravaganza” EXCESSIVE FORCE, the film that was supposed to launch Thomas Ian Griffith to action superstardom. Instead of the next Steven Seagal, he became the next Michael Dudikoff (look it up). As we discuss, the guy is certainly the master of sweep kicks, elder abuse, and gross double entendres.


Ep. #2-She’s So Lovely



On this week’s episode we discuss 1997’s SHE’S SO LOVELY, a romantic comedy featuring a hard-drinking, chain-smoking, and very pregnant Robin Wright Penn, with Sean Penn and John Travolta as the two men who just might be crazy enough to fall in love with her. Emphasis on the crazy. Did we mention this film features sexual assault in the first five minutes? And that this was billed as a comedy? We break down how it only takes “journeyman” director Nick Cassavetes (The Other Woman, The Notebook) 95 minutes to desecrate his father John’s legacy.